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ixxxx TP-Link AV2000 Powerline Adapter - 2 Gigabit Ports; Power over Ethernet; Plug & Play Power Saving, 2x2 MIMO, Noise Filtering, Extra Power Socket for other devices; Suitable for Gaming (TL-PA9020P KIT) gifts for children
ixxxx TP-Link AV2000 Powerline Adapter - 2 Gigabit Ports; Power over Ethernet; Plug & Play Power Saving, 2x2 MIMO, Noise Filtering, Extra Power Socket for other devices; Suitable for Gaming (TL-PA9020P KIT) gifts for children
ixxxx TP-Link AV2000 Powerline Adapter - 2 Gigabit Ports; Power over Ethernet; Plug & Play Power Saving, 2x2 MIMO, Noise Filtering, Extra Power Socket for other devices; Suitable for Gaming (TL-PA9020P KIT) gifts for children
ixxxx TP-Link AV2000 Powerline Adapter - 2 Gigabit Ports; Power over Ethernet; Plug & Play Power Saving, 2x2 MIMO, Noise Filtering, Extra Power Socket for other devices; Suitable for Gaming (TL-PA9020P KIT) gifts for children
ixxxx TP-Link AV2000 Powerline Adapter - 2 Gigabit Ports; Power over Ethernet; Plug & Play Power Saving, 2x2 MIMO, Noise Filtering, Extra Power Socket for other devices; Suitable for Gaming (TL-PA9020P KIT) gifts for children
ixxxx TP-Link AV2000 Powerline Adapter - 2 Gigabit Ports; Power over Ethernet; Plug & Play Power Saving, 2x2 MIMO, Noise Filtering, Extra Power Socket for other devices; Suitable for Gaming (TL-PA9020P KIT) gifts for children

ixxxx TP-Link AV2000 Powerline Adapter - 2 Gigabit Ports; Power over Ethernet; Plug & Play Power Saving, 2x2 MIMO, Noise Filtering, Extra Power Socket for other devices; Suitable for Gaming (TL-PA9020P KIT) gifts for children

Item code #:sku-dNWfm*
$USD 772.000$USD 818.000

760 in stock.

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What is ixxxx TP-Link AV2000 Powerline Adapter - 2 Gigabit Ports; Power over Ethernet; Plug & Play Power Saving, 2x2 MIMO, Noise Filtering, Extra Power Socket for other devices; Suitable for Gaming (TL-PA9020P KIT) gifts for children?
      Bought this product ixxxx in hopes to create a ixxxx more stable connection than my wi-fi. I have 2100 sq. ft home and my Netgear R6400v2 ixxxx does a really ixxxx good ixxxx job with signal throughout the ixxxx home. I ixxxx get about 70mbps - ixxxx 100mbps when I run speed tests at various ixxxx points ixxxx throughout the day and month. The new ixxxx powerline adapter gets me slightly ixxxx lower ixxxx than that at about ixxxx 60-70mbps. My hope is that the connection is just more stable and frees ixxxx up my wi-fi from my office computer for ixxxx work to be used by my ixxxx smart home devices ixxxx (cameras ixxxx etc)Data ixxxx encryption by 128 bit AES ixxxx to make the network ixxxx safe and privatePlug & Play, ixxxx No new wires and ixxxx no configuration ixxxx required; Compatible with all ixxxx AV2000, AV1300, AV1200, AV1000, AV600, AV500 & AV200 PowerPoint adapters; Modulation technology: offAs network ixxxx adapters support Home Plug AV2, Easy to add multiple adapters and works ixxxx under ixxxx 110 240V; ixxxx The ixxxx best powering: ixxxx 'the best power ixxxx line networking kit' the wire ixxxx cutterPlease note ixxxx that powerline adapters ixxxx must be deployed in ixxxx sets of two ixxxx or ixxxx moreI needed a way to get an ethernet cable ixxxx from my second floor to my basement without running ixxxx cables. So, I bought ixxxx the Powerline. Initially, I was disappointed with it because my ixxxx streaming would ixxxx stop mid-program due ixxxx to no network connection. I had the devices on the ixxxx same electrical ixxxx phase but not the same ixxxx circuit breaker. ixxxx I ixxxx found an article ixxxx on ixxxx the web that said they ixxxx should be on ixxxx the same circuit breaker/fuse. I moved the Powerline devices to the same circuit breaker and ixxxx the loss of network connection stopped.My network has gigabit ethernet switches in the basement and on the second ixxxx floor. The router and internet modem ixxxx are on the second floor. The loss of network ixxxx was ixxxx occurring when I streamed, via ROKU, ixxxx to my basement TV.As part of my problem ixxxx analysis, I ixxxx periodically ran PING tests (with 1K ixxxx data packets) from devices on ixxxx the basement and second floor ixxxx networks. Following are the results after ixxxx I ixxxx got ixxxx it ixxxx working -- ixxxx On the same floor/switch the response ixxxx between ixxxx local devices was ixxxx 1 ms ixxxx (minimum, maximum and average). PINGs ixxxx to devices on the other ixxxx floor/switch the response was 1-3, 8-12 and 3.8-4.5 ms (minimum, maximum and average).I ixxxx also ran a ixxxx few tests copying files from ixxxx one floor to the other. On average, it transfers ixxxx at 107 KBS.Worked GREAT for the last 2 years ixxxx until lighting struck ixxxx right by my house last Monday, and fried the device ixxxx which was connected ixxxx to my ixxxx router, ixxxx then partially fried the ixxxx router, then ixxxx the modem ... ixxxx aaaand:- ixxxx the WAN ixxxx port of one of my WiFi access points plugged into the router- ixxxx the ethernet port of ixxxx my USB-C port, also plugged into ixxxx the routerSince the device has ixxxx to ixxxx be plugged ixxxx directly into the outlet, there's no avoiding ixxxx its getting fried during a surge.BUT you ixxxx can avoid the chain-reaction of other things ixxxx frying by adding an ixxxx RJ-45 (ethernet) coupler ixxxx to the ethernet cable coming ixxxx out of each ixxxx of the devices, like this ixxxx one: https://amzn.to/3Cz2P51Having said ixxxx all this, it's STILL a GREAT device, which ixxxx has allowed ixxxx me to extend my home network with ixxxx reliability.I ixxxx just ordered a replacement device for the one that fried.Kindly Reminder: Powerline ixxxx Adapters must be on the same electrical circuit for ixxxx connectivity. ixxxx Requires direct outlet ixxxx plug ixxxx in. Does not work ixxxx with surge protectors. Appliances and devices running on the ixxxx same ixxxx circuit ixxxx may affect powerline performance.Power ixxxx line adapter provides up to 2000Mbps Ethernet ixxxx over Power; Ideal to be Ethernet extender who can easily go over ixxxx the walls1. ixxxx Wasn't clear to me, but ixxxx as ixxxx one would hope... If ixxxx you turn off a ixxxx connected device, then ixxxx of course ixxxx that device's Ethernet turns off. And ixxxx the Tp-Link status lights ixxxx no longer shows an Ethernet connection, and sometimes not a power-line connection either. But then turning ixxxx that device ixxxx back on, ixxxx the TP-Link automatically re-connects.2. (I will say ixxxx 240v here, but sometimes ixxxx noted as 220v.) Most U.S. homes have one 240v phase (two wires) entering. Adding ixxxx a "neutral", ixxxx that ixxxx gets split into ixxxx two 120v phases, with some 120v circuits on each phase. Two TP-Links work for ixxxx me, if their power outlets ixxxx are on the same phase, even ixxxx if behind different breakers. ixxxx However another reviewer ixxxx did ixxxx not seem to ixxxx find this. If yours do ixxxx not, ixxxx you might try resetting both breakers. Not ixxxx a ixxxx bad idea anyway ixxxx once in a while, as breakers ixxxx can get stiff/ "sticky".Another ixxxx reviewer says TP-Links ixxxx do not ixxxx connect across different ixxxx phases, which ixxxx seems reasonable, and I did not test ixxxx that.You can ixxxx test ixxxx whether two candidate ixxxx outlets are on the same ixxxx 120v phase, with long enough 120v extension cord(s), and ixxxx a volt meter. Or ixxxx inspect at their breaker box.(3) Comes with two cat-5e cables. 5e is ok on paper. But I understand that some manufacturers' 5e is ixxxx not very robust ixxxx physically, and can degrade speed wise, even from getting ixxxx stepped on. If you will buy a longer cable anyway, ixxxx or ixxxx on the ixxxx off-chance to improve ixxxx speed, ixxxx 6a is better nowadays, and you might as well go to cat-8.(4) Plugging ixxxx into a standard ixxxx wall two-socket device ixxxx (vertical, say)... TP-Link does hide ixxxx the upper ground. But you should not plug anything else into that ixxxx upper ixxxx socket anyway. If you must plug another load ixxxx there, use the ixxxx TP-Link's pass-through socket. Yes, other loads on the same circuit are "in parallel". But high frequencies can care about such spacing. ixxxx CheersPower saving mode automatically ixxxx reduces power consumption by up to 85 percentGigabit port, give you Full speed of Your internet; ixxxx Transmission ixxxx speeds: Ethernet 10/100/1000 Mbps, range 300 meters In house
      TP-Link AV2000 Powerline Adapter - 2 Gigabit Ports, Ethernet Over Power, Plug&Play, Power Saving, 2x2 MIMO, Noise Filtering, Extra Power Socket for other Devices, Ideal for Gaming (TL-PA9020P KIT)Power line adapter provides up ixxxx to ixxxx 2000Mbps Ethernet over ixxxx Power; Ideal ixxxx to be Ethernet ixxxx extender who ixxxx can easily go over the wallsAs ixxxx network adapters support Home Plug AV2, Easy to add multiple adapters and works ixxxx under 110 240V; The best powering: 'the best ixxxx power line networking kit' the wire cutterGigabit port, ixxxx give you Full speed of Your internet; Transmission speeds: Ethernet 10/100/1000 Mbps, range 300 ixxxx meters In ixxxx housePower saving ixxxx mode automatically reduces ixxxx power consumption ixxxx by up to ixxxx 85 percentPlug & Play, No new wires and no configuration required; Compatible with all AV2000, AV1300, AV1200, AV1000, AV600, AV500 & AV200 ixxxx PowerPoint adapters; Modulation technology: ixxxx offData encryption by ixxxx 128 bit ixxxx AES to ixxxx make ixxxx the network safe and ixxxx privatePlease note ixxxx that powerline adapters ixxxx must be deployed ixxxx in sets of two ixxxx or moreKindly ixxxx Reminder: Powerline Adapters must be on the ixxxx same ixxxx electrical circuit for connectivity. Requires direct outlet plug in. Does not work with ixxxx surge protectors. Appliances and ixxxx devices running ixxxx on the same circuit ixxxx may affect powerline performance.

How to use TP-Link AV2000 Powerline Adapter - 2 Gigabit Ports; Power over Ethernet; Plug & Play Power Saving, 2x2 MIMO, Noise Filtering, Extra Power Socket for other devices; Suitable for Gaming (TL-PA9020P KIT) ?
      ixxxx TP-Link AV2000 Powerline Adapter - 2 Gigabit Ports; Power over Ethernet; Plug & Play Power Saving, 2x2 MIMO, Noise Filtering, Extra Power Socket for other devices; Suitable for Gaming (TL-PA9020P KIT) gifts for children

Buyer's experience:
      1: 1. Wasn't clear to me, but as one would hope... If you turn off a connected device, then of course that device's Ethernet turns off. And the Tp-Link status lights no longer shows an Ethernet connection, and sometimes not a power-line connection either. But then turning that device back on, the TP-Link automatically re-connects.2. (I will say 240v here, but sometimes noted as 220v.) Most U.S. homes have one 240v phase (two wires) entering. Adding a "neutral", that gets split into two 120v phases, with some 120v circuits on each phase. Two TP-Links work for me, if their power outlets are on the same phase, even if behind different breakers. However another reviewer did not seem to find this. If yours do not, you might try resetting both breakers. Not a bad idea anyway once in a while, as breakers can get stiff/ "sticky".Another reviewer says TP-Links do not connect across different phases, which seems reasonable, and I did not test that.You can test whether two candidate outlets are on the same 120v phase, with long enough 120v extension cord(s), and a volt meter. Or inspect at their breaker box.(3) Comes with two cat-5e cables. 5e is ok on paper. But I understand that some manufacturers' 5e is not very robust physically, and can degrade speed wise, even from getting stepped on. If you will buy a longer cable anyway, or on the off-chance to improve speed, 6a is better nowadays, and you might as well go to cat-8.(4) Plugging into a standard wall two-socket device (vertical, say)... TP-Link does hide the upper ground. But you should not plug anything else into that upper socket anyway. If you must plug another load there, use the TP-Link's pass-through socket. Yes, other loads on the same circuit are "in parallel". But high frequencies can care about such spacing. Cheers
      2: Worked GREAT for the last 2 years until lighting struck right by my house last Monday, and fried the device which was connected to my router, then partially fried the router, then the modem ... aaaand:- the WAN port of one of my WiFi access points plugged into the router- the ethernet port of my USB-C port, also plugged into the routerSince the device has to be plugged directly into the outlet, there's no avoiding its getting fried during a surge.BUT you can avoid the chain-reaction of other things frying by adding an RJ-45 (ethernet) coupler to the ethernet cable coming out of each of the devices, like this one: https://amzn.to/3Cz2P51Having said all this, it's STILL a GREAT device, which has allowed me to extend my home network with reliability.I just ordered a replacement device for the one that fried.
      3: I needed a way to get an ethernet cable from my second floor to my basement without running cables. So, I bought the Powerline. Initially, I was disappointed with it because my streaming would stop mid-program due to no network connection. I had the devices on the same electrical phase but not the same circuit breaker. I found an article on the web that said they should be on the same circuit breaker/fuse. I moved the Powerline devices to the same circuit breaker and the loss of network connection stopped.My network has gigabit ethernet switches in the basement and on the second floor. The router and internet modem are on the second floor. The loss of network was occurring when I streamed, via ROKU, to my basement TV.As part of my problem analysis, I periodically ran PING tests (with 1K data packets) from devices on the basement and second floor networks. Following are the results after I got it working -- On the same floor/switch the response between local devices was 1 ms (minimum, maximum and average). PINGs to devices on the other floor/switch the response was 1-3, 8-12 and 3.8-4.5 ms (minimum, maximum and average).I also ran a few tests copying files from one floor to the other. On average, it transfers at 107 KBS.
      4: Bought this product in hopes to create a more stable connection than my wi-fi. I have 2100 sq. ft home and my Netgear R6400v2 does a really good job with signal throughout the home. I get about 70mbps - 100mbps when I run speed tests at various points throughout the day and month. The new powerline adapter gets me slightly lower than that at about 60-70mbps. My hope is that the connection is just more stable and frees up my wi-fi from my office computer for work to be used by my smart home devices (cameras etc)

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Bob
This is a beautiful stuff.
2021.03.06 12:00
Bob
This is a beautiful stuff.
2021.03.06 12:00
Bob
This is a beautiful stuff.
2021.03.06 12:00